The Untold Truth Of Clark Hunt

Clark Hunt, the chairman and CEO of the Kansas City Chiefs, is preparing for his team to come face to face with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers for Super Bowl LV on Feb. 7, 2021. Hunt has been with the team for about two decades, gaining the CEO title in 2010, per his official Chiefs profile. He's led the Chiefs to five AFC West Division Championships and seven playoff games since becoming CEO. Plus, Super Bowl LV will be the Chief's second Super Bowl appearance in a row, coming off of a 31-20 win over the San Francisco 49ers in 2020.

Hunt is the son of sports legend Lamar Hunt, who not only founded the Kansas City Chiefs, but also "served as the guiding force behind the formation of both the American Football League," according to his Chiefs biography. The name may sound familiar to some, as the Lamar Hunt Trophy — which is presented to the winner of the AFC league each year — is named after the beloved football enthusiast. In 2020, when Clark Hunt and the Chiefs were presented with the trophy, he said (per USA Today), "To hold and kiss this trophy really means a lot, and I think that's true for my whole family." 

Football clearly means the world to Hunt and his family, but that hasn't stopped the billionaire from being at the center of controversy. With that in mind, let's take a closer look at the untold truth of Clark Hunt.

Clark Hunt was at the center of a Black Lives Matter controversy

Clark Hunt turned some heads due to his statement regarding the Black Lives Matter movement around the time former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick started kneeling during the national anthem. In 2017, Hunt released a statement that verbalized his wishes for his Kansas City Chiefs players to stand during the anthem. "I believe in honoring the American flag and supporting all of those whose sacrifices protect the many freedoms we have in this country, including the right to have differences of opinion," he said. He also acknowledged that people need to "engage one another with empathy and humility to gain a better understanding of ways we can work together to solve these difficult issues."

However, he seemed to change his attitude three years later when responding to questions from the Kansas City Star. He said while he encouraged players to stand during the anthem, the decision is theirs. "These issues are important to our players. They're important to our coaching staff, our entire organization. This is the time to be sensitive. It's a time to listen. It's a time to understand," he stated. 

Hunt also received criticism after a strongly worded Facebook post that was said to be from his personal account circulated around the internet. The post said if you don't stand during the national anthem, you're not a Chief. However, PolitiFact deemed the post to be fake.

Hunt believes God has helped the Chiefs reach greatness

Aside from the sheer skill of the players and coaches behind the Kansas City Chiefs, Clark Hunt believes God has helped propel the team to its successes. Upon accepting the Lamar Hunt Trophy ahead of Super Bowl LV, he thanked God for helping his team. "I'm so honored to accept this trophy on behalf of this incredible team, and the best fans in the National Football League," he said, per CBN News. "The Lord has blessed our family in so many ways. Coach (Andy) Reid, what a game today. Great job today. My dad would love the grit and determination of this team."

This wasn't the first time Hunt incorporated his strong religion into football. According to the Tyler Morning Telegraph, Hunt has brought his faith into the stadium by offering pregame church services at Arrowhead Stadium, where the Chiefs play. "We want our employees to develop spiritually. In the National Football League, Christ is really glorified. My identity is my faith in Christ," he said.